Latin American Studies (LAS)

Introductory Common Curriculum Courses

LAS T121 First-Year Seminar 3 crs.

Introductory Common Curriculum: First-Year Seminar

The gateway course to the Common Curriculum is the First-Year Seminar (FYS). This issues-based, interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to college-level thinking and learning as well as Jesuit values at the core of a Loyola education. This FYS has a specific topic within the scope of Latin American Studies. A full list of currently offered FYS courses can be found on the Loyola Online Records Access (LORA) system.

Major & Advanced Common Curriculum Courses 

LAS H295 Revolution! Latin America/Middle East 3 crs.

University Honors Program

This course compares Central American and Western Asian literature and film during the respective Marxist/Indigenous and Islamic revolutions. Through novels, short stories and film, the class analyzes specific revolutionary issues in Latin America with a comparative lens. The class considers how the nuanced human element of political unrest changes the dynamics of revolution in three different stages: before it becomes violent; during the event itself; and after the dust has settled. The class also considers what effects US foreign policy has had on these revolutions in Latin America and Western Asia, focusing on issues of social justice.

LAS V200: Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Culture 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Culture
RAC: Diversity        

This introduction to Latin American Studies focuses on the rich cultural heritage that has come to form part of the Latin American identity.  Using literature, film, music and visual arts, both produced by and about Latin America, student study the issues that have faced the region and its people throughout its recent history and had an impact on its identity.  This is an intersiciplinary course that allows students to understand Latino communities through different academic lenses.

LAS V202 Latin Diaspora: Music Industry and Dance 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course examines how Salsa, as a musical form and a commercial concept that represents an urban lifestyle, has evolved in response to the assimilation of the Puerto Rican minority in the United States.  Salsa music is useful in examining the links between society and culture, and allows  students to understand the ways in which the recording industry interprets collective sensibilities and histories in order to conceive and trade aesthetic commodities. 

LAS V220 Education and Social Change in Latin America 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Social Science
RAC: Diversity

This course introduces students to the notion of curriculum as the educational product of contending forces within the society out of which it emerges. It relies heavily on the work of Paulo Freire and his sharp critique of the banking approach to education where knowledge is simply deposited and withdrawn. It explores the forces by which learners are induced or seduced to comply with the dominant ideologies and social practices related to authority, behavior, morality and/or spirituality. It imagines possibilities where all citizens participate freely and fully in the creation and recreation of meaning and values that make democracy healthy.

LAS V235 Women Writers of Spanish America 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course provides a survey of major Spanish-American women writers of the 20th and 21st centuries, covering different literary periods, genres and countries (with emphasis on narrative). Through detailed discussion of the texts, films, and oral presentations, students explore the complex cultural and historical realities that have shaped the writings of Spanish American authors in general and women in particular. This course is cross-listed with SPAN V235.

This course satisfies an Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013. This course does not satisfy requirements for the 2013-2014 Common Curriculum.

LAS V238: WAL: Central American Revolutions-A Literary Look 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Diversity

This course offers readings, discussion and textual analysis of selected works, including novels, short stories, drama, poetry and film by Central American authors during periods of revolution.  In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of Central America revolutions.  The study of literature adds nuance to the sociological and historical “facts” of these events rather than seeing these revolutionary movements as monolithic. Students learn how to write about these nuances in meaningful ways.

LAS V263 Creating Spanish America 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures
RAC: Diversity

This course examines creative forms incuding myth, architecture, ceramics, weaving, film, fiction, literature and ethics in Spanish America from the pre-Colombian past to the beginning of the 19th century.  The juxtaposition of these artifacts and issues bring to the fore the diverse and predominant trends of each period and their interaction with historical and social forces. This course is cross-listed with SPAN J263.

LAS V302 Borderlands Literature 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Diversity

This course handles novels, short stories, drama, poetry, essays and films by authors situated either geographically or culturally in a borderlans between the US and Latin American countries.  In this writing-intensive course, students learn to read, think and write critically about literature while explorign the historical and cultural realities of Chican@/Latin@ peoples in the borderlands of the US from the 19th to the present day.

LAS V332: WAL: Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Diversity

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. 

Major Courses in Other Disciplines

Latin American Studies is an interdisciplinary program, and a number of courses from other departments and programs are eligible for inclusion. A list of these courses can be found on the Latin American Studies program website, as well as on the degree program course listing (DPCL) and minor tracking sheet.