Classical Studies (CLHU)

Major Courses

CLHU A480 Capstone: Special Topics 1 cr.

RAC: Premodern

The capstone presents the tools and techniques for analysis, interpretation and research of literautre and material culture necessary to pursuign a successful career in Classical Studies at all levels. 

CLHU A498 Thesis Research 3 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

CLHU A499 Thesis 3 crs.

Students who have satisfactorily completed their research register for this course while they write their honors thesis.

Prerequisite: CLHU A498

Advanced Common Curriculum

CLHU U202 WAL: Classical Greece

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Premodern

This course is a survey of the Greek world in the late Archaic and Classical periods, with particular emphasis on the polis Athens and its extraordinary and transformational role in the reals of politics and wardare, as well as intellectual, scientific and artisitc endeavor.  Through the examination of primary authors, chief among them Herodotus and Thucydides, we explore the origins, trajectories and outcomes of the Persian and Peloponnesian wars as well as details of daily life.

CLHU U204 WAL: Greece - The Age of Heroes 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Premodern

This course is a political, social and cultural survey of the Greek world from its semi-legendary beginnings in the Mycenean age to the end of the Archaic period.  A particular focus is on the development of material culture and Greek letters during this perios as the ultimate fruit of a greater exchange with and openness to cross-cultural synthesis.  Throughout the course, students are encouraged to think critically about a variety of textual sources from the ancient world.

CLHU U206 WAL: The Later Roman Empire 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Premodern

This course explores all the major aspects of late Roman civilization, roughly from 300 — 700 A.D. Study covers political, economic, military, social, and religious developments with focus on the effects of the Germanic and Islamic invasions. Students examines a wide variety of textual and physical evidence.

CLHU U208 WAL: The Rise of Rome 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Premodern

This course is a political, social and cultural survey of the Roman Empire and its immediate predecessor, the Late Republic, beginning with the Dictatorship of Sulla and ending with the death of Asrcus Aurelius.  We consider the creation and development of the imperial regime, exploring the various types of challenges (military, cultural and religious) to the hegemony of Rome, as well as the transformation of the ROman political system, society and culture down to the end of the second c AD.

CLHU U238 Justice in Greek Literature 3 crs.

Justice is the foundation of civilized society. It is at once the condition and means of concord and harmony among men. Greek poets and philosophers were among the first to investigate the nature of justice. Examination of their writings on this subject can alert latter-day students to its importance and to its nature.

CLHU U242 The Development of Greek Tragedy 3 crs.

This course involves the reading in English of a selection of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and their relationship to the development of Greek theater and performance.

CLHU U244 The Greek and Roman Epic 3 crs.

This course is a survey in English of Greek and Latin epics, such as the works of Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Lucan, and Statius.

CLHU U246 Greek Mythology 3 crs.

This course is a study of the origins, themes, and significance of Greek mythology, with emphasis on myth as a vestige of primitive thought and on the corpus of Greek myths as a source of Greek and Roman literature.

CLHU U247 Egyptian Art and Archaeology 3 crs.

This course is a survey of artistic works and monuments of ancient Egypt from the Pre-dynastic Period through the Ptolemies of the Hellenistic Period with an emphasis on stylistic developments in the three main areas of painting, sculpture and architecture.

CLHU U248 Greek Art and Archaeology 3 crs.

A survey of artistic works and monuments of ancient Greece from the Geometric through the Hellenistic periods (c. 1000 — 50 B.C.) with an emphasis on stylistic developments in the main areas of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

CLHU U250 Roman Art and Archaeology 3 crs.

This course offers students a survey of the most important works of art and monuments of ancient Rome from the beginnings of the city through the period of Constantine, emphasizing stylistic developments in the areas of sculpture, architecture, and painting, with some consideration of materials and techniques. Works of the Etruscans, Greeks, and Italic peoples are considered for their influence.

CLHU U256 Greek Elegies and Lyrics 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to lyric and elegiac forms of individual poetic expression. Consideration will be given to the technical terms referring to the poems studied, their themes, and performance. Authors include Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Alcaeus, and Sappho among others.

CLHU U257 Greek Culture 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures
RAC: Premodern

This course is a multi-disciplinary survey of the interdependence of the arts and culture in the Greek world from its semi-legendary beginnings in the Mycenaean age through the Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period. We will explore the contribution of the arts on Greek culture, from architecture to sculpture to drama to cuisine, with particular emphasis on its extraordinary continuity throughout the centuries as well as its massive influence – by way of its reception from the Renaissance onwards - on the development of the art, thought and morality of the Western world.

CLHU U258 Roman Culture 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures
RAC: Premodern

This course examines the literature, culture, history, politics, and daily life of the ancient Romans from the legendary beginning of the city in 753 B.C. to the fifth century A.D. Readings include Latin literature in translation and secondary texts that provide archaeological evidence and the historical context.

CLHU U263 Greek and Roman Comedy 3 crs.

This course is a survey of Greek and Roman comedy including works by Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus. The course considers the significant social and political issues as well as the plays’ appeal, significance, and legacy for us today.

CLHU U265 Pagans and Christians 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Premodern
RAC: Catholic Traditions

This course examines the triumph of Christianity over paganism in the Roman Empire. Focusing on the debate and culture clash between the two in the fourth century, students discuss and write on important controversies of the age and their relation to our own times.

This course satisfies a Common Curriculum Humanities/Arts requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013. 

CLHU U268 Roman Republic 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Premodern

This course examines the rise and decline of the Roman Republic from the founding of the city (c. 800 B.C.) to the assassination of Julius Caesar (44 B.C.). The course explores political, economic, military, religious, and societal topics.

This course satisfies a Common Curriculum Humanities/Arts requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013. 

CLHU U274 The Byzantine Empire 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures
RAC: Premodern

The Byzantine Empire is a survey of the interdependence of the arts, spirituality and intellectual life within the historical context of the Byzantine world from the reign of Constantine until the fall of Constantinople in 1453. We will explore the interplay of Byzantine art and culture in all its many manifestations, with particular emphasis on the extraordinary continuity and transformations of Byzantine culture as well as its massive influence on the development of the Western world.

CLHU U275 The Ancient Novel 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Premodern

This course traces the development of the novel in the earliest examples from Greek and Roman antiquity. These works detail the adventures of young men and women determined to preserve their integrity while searching for their true identities. Readings include Longus’ Daphne and Chloe, Petronius’ Satyricon, and Heliodorus’ An Ethiopian Story.

This course satisfies a Common Curriculum Humanities/Arts requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013. 

CLHU U280 Ancient Mystery Cults 3 crs.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Premodern

By their very nature, ancient mystery cults were secretive and their rituals known only to the initiates. This course examines, in translation, a wide variety of ancient sources to see what can be learned about cults ranging from Demeter to Isis to early Christianity.

This course satisfies a Common Curriculum Humanities/Arts requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013. 

CLHU U340 Roman Ethical Thought

Advanced Common Curriculum: Ethics
RAC: Premodern

This course introduces students to ancient Roman virtue ethics.  It examines how ancient Roman thikners conceptualize the best human state and the ethical frameworks they derive from this for living their lives.  Besides analyzing the arguments that support these frameworks, the course focuses on how they transform ancient thinker's views on such issues as virtue, pleasure, love, friendship, happiness, or death, and the role they have to play in a good human life.

CLHU U362: WAL: Alexander the Great

Advanced Common Curriculum: Writing About Literature
RAC: Premodern

This class explores the world of Greece in the post-Classical age into which Alexander was born, and the complex and often contradictory personality and astonishing deeds of the man himself in light of the historigraphical difficulties in separating "Alexander the man" from "Alexander the legend." It also examines the nature of his military success, the lasting effects of his image upon ancient art, and finally, his long-term impact on the varied people and lands of his empire.